Tag: Spring

Music and Tea on the Lawn – Afternoons for relaxing

A new series of gentle, relaxed afternoons where you can take full advantage of the Gardens for some ‘me-time’.
We’ve asked some of the best local or artisan food businesses to run a one day pop-up cafe in the Orangery at the Gardens.
This month you can try some truly luscious cakes made by Bakes and Bits.
They currently operate in the city centre but hail originally from Castle Bromwich.

To put the ‘cherry on the cake’ of your afternoon experience we are also offering aspiring local musicians a chance to entertain our visitors while they chill and chomp on their cupcakes. We may not have a bandstand.. but we’ll have handpicked buskers to bathe your ears.
Good prices, good food and good company ..

Usual Garden entry prices
PS – We are still offering music slots – contact us if you are interested in knowing more
(Sun May 21st, Sat June 17th , Sat. July 8th & Sun July 23rd)

Bonnet, Eggs and Circuses for Easter

Saturday April 15th: The day for our traditional Easter Bonnet Parade for all you young creative makers out there – let your imagination go! Prizes for all ages

Also this year: Egg hunts, crafts,  face painting by Rowan (Glittercreep) & circus skills for all the family with CircusMash – juggling those eggs, plate spinning and tightwire (weather dependent).

Normal entrance fees: £4.50/£ 4 (plus Gift Aid), children £1, under 5s free

Family Activities Annual Pass holders -free

One we saw earlier…Goldcrest

It may be the UK’s smallest bird, but it was easy to see this afternoon in the Gardens.

Goldcrest at RSPB Portmore Lough. Credit Tim Ryan.

Working down in the Spinney, Volunteer and Trustee Bill shared some time with the beautiful little bird (Regulus regulus). It washed itself at the edge of the pond and flitted about, apparently happily at home with us humans.

Find out more about the Goldcrest on the RSPB site HERE

So happy we are keeping an environment fit for the tiniest of of flying friends. #wegrowtogether

 

 

White and Green – Snowdrops and a Green man

Celebrate the return of the light with the ‘sweet harbinger of Spring’, the delicate snowdrop.  Sunday 5th February  11am -3pm.

Our snowdrops have been increasing every year and they make a delightful show of sprinkled white and green in the Lower Wilderness. The first Snowdrop day Sunday 5th February is a family day out dedicated to welcoming back the longer days and brighter light.

For ‘gardeners’ there will be short guided walks and sales of plants, our Green Man will delight us with stories and song about spring and winter.

Join us in making simple lanterns to light our way round and fashion a traditional Brigid Cross to hang on your door.

Hot drinks and homemade soup will be available in the shop.

£4.50 (including optional Gift Aid), Children £1
RHS & Garden members £3.20

Come back to see the later flowering snowdrops on a second snowdrop Sunday (19th February).

 

Flowers from the past

1760 was a long time ago, especially in flower terms.

Plant and garden enthusiasts develop hundreds, if not thousands, of new plant varieties every year. Here at Castle Bromwich Hall Gardens we try to grow plants that would have been familiar to the gardeners up till the mid 18th century.

Sometimes, especially with simpler plants and herbs, there has been little change; looking at old drawings and engravings you can easily identify some plants we grow today. Others have been refined and developed far from their origins. Flowerheads are often bred for brighter colours and greater showiness.

Here we try to get a balance between pleasing our 21st century eyes and maintaining a period 17th and 18th century feel.

For our spring displays we have a mix of modern and older daffodils and tulips. This year we are particularly pleased to introduce two stunning early flowers both as it happens, supplied to us by Thomas Etty Esq. of Somerset.

narcissus-poeticus-plenus-alba-odoratus

The narcissus poeticus albus plenus odoratus was probably around before 1590 and sometimes is called the double Pheasants Eye or Gardenia-flowered narcissus. It’s all white (albus) with a full and ‘plentiful’ centre (plenus) and very fragrant (odoratus). We hope you will find it peeping over some of our box hedges on the North Border. On a sunny day you may even smell it  before you see it.

The second reintroduction is of tulipa sylvestris. Thomas Etty describes it as

“Violet scented almond-shaped lemon yellow flowers in mid April. Naturalises well in grass. Said, bywoodland tulip some, to have first travelled to these shores attached upon the roots of grape vines brought from Italy by the Romans.”

Although ‘sylvestris’ suggests a woodland setting, we will plant them on the sloping bank
behind the Holly Walk, alongside the cowslips, primroses and daffodils. Magical!

 

 

2000 bulbs to plant….

It’s that time of year again. Can you help us out?

Tulips were a ‘really big thing’ for our Gardens’ founders. In the 17th century there was even ‘tulipmania’; massive fortunes were won and lost by enthusiasts and tulip traders.

These days we’re a bit more level headed, but we are mad about the beauty of our spring borders.

Many of our lovely ‘daffs’ come back year after year and naturalise in the orchard and img_20160331_194725_26185577776_ograssy banks. But like tulips, they need renewing every now and then.

This year we have over 2,000 tulips, daffodils and narcissi to plant before the cold frost comes.

Can you help us? 

trumpetYou don’t need to be an expert, just come and join us on Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday mornings next week and be part of the planting team.  We’ll show you how.

We’ll be planting from 10am – 12.30 . on 29th, 30th November & 1st December. Weather permitting. Warming tea and coffee supplied.  Turn up at 10, or contact us in advance.

Plant the little globes full of flower goodness… stand back and wait for a spectacular spring! 

PS There will be a lot of kneeling and digging with a hand trowel